Coronavirus Daily A daily news podcast about the coronavirus pandemic, covering all dimensions of the story from science to economics and politics as well as society and culture. Hosted by Kelly McEvers from Embedded. Approximately 10 minutes in length. Publishing weekday afternoons. Includes stories and interviews from NPR's Science, International, National, Business and Washington reporting teams, as well as station reporters, and the crews at Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Coronavirus Daily

From NPR

A daily news podcast about the coronavirus pandemic, covering all dimensions of the story from science to economics and politics as well as society and culture. Hosted by Kelly McEvers from Embedded. Approximately 10 minutes in length. Publishing weekday afternoons. Includes stories and interviews from NPR's Science, International, National, Business and Washington reporting teams, as well as station reporters, and the crews at Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Most Recent Episodes

A sign "Temporarily Closed" is seen in front of a store amid the coronavirus pandemic on May 14, 2020 in Arlington, Virginia. - Another 3 million people filed initial unemployment claims last week on a seasonally adjusted basis, according to the Department of Labor. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

Optimism For A Vaccine; Strapped Unemployment Offices Leave Many Waiting

A new analysis from Columbia University says that roughly 36,000 people could've been saved if the United States had started social distancing just one week earlier. But that all hinges on whether people would have been willing to stay home.

Optimism For A Vaccine; Strapped Unemployment Offices Leave Many Waiting

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Armed demonstrators protest in Lansing, Michigan, during a rally organized by Michigan United for Liberty on May 14 to protest the coronavirus pandemic stay-at-home orders. Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer said on May 13 that protests against the state's emergency orders might make it necessary for the state to keep restrictions in place longer. The orders have been extended until May 28. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

What Contact Tracing Tells Us About High-Risk Activities

Three-quarters of Americans are concerned that a second wave of coronavirus cases will emerge, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Despite that, groups around the country, including in Michigan, are protesting state lockdowns.

What Contact Tracing Tells Us About High-Risk Activities

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A man walks past a sign reading "Welcome Back, Now Open" on Fort Lauderdale Beach Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on May 18. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Indoor Spread, Workers' Anxieties, And Our Warped Sense Of Time

There are still a lot of questions about how the coronavirus is transmitted through air. Researchers are looking at how the virus is spread indoors and how to safely have people under one roof.

Indoor Spread, Workers' Anxieties, And Our Warped Sense Of Time

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Demonstrators protest in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on May 15, demanding the reopening of the state and against Governor Tom Wolf's shutdown orders during the coronavirus pandemic. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Encouraging Vaccine News; Pandemic Grows More Political

A new coronavirus vaccine candidate shows encouraging results. It's early, but preliminary data shows it appears to be eliciting the kind of immune response capable of preventing disease.

Encouraging Vaccine News; Pandemic Grows More Political

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